Friday, 21 November 2014

18% of internet users are responsible for over 80% of video shares

"While almost one in five (17.9%) internet users are sharing video content with their social networks these ‘super sharers’ are responsible for the majority (82.4%) of all video shares.
In the Geography of Sharing report from marketing technology company Unruly, the networks used were analysed and it found that more than three quarters of video views take place outside of YouTube.
In terms of where video is being shared, it is a fragmented picture. While Facebook sees the most videos shared (59.4%) worldwide, viewers share across a multitude of platforms including Twitter (13.8%), Google+ (9.3%), Tumblr (5.7%) and Pinterest (3.9%).
Among its other findings were that South Koreans are the fastest sharers, with 20% of shares occurring within the first 24 hours of launch and its citizens are also more likely to click, replay or share an ad than any other territories worldwide.
However viewers in Germany are more likely to watch an ad to the end; 79% of Germans who watched an ad stayed till the final frame. The UK was in second place with 77%."

Netflix accounts for nearly 35% of US peak time internet traffic

"Netflix continues to dominate North American networks, accounting for 34.9 per cent of downstream traffic in the peak evening hours
Amazon Instant Video has established itself as the second largest paid streaming video service in North America. While still only accounting for 2.6 per cent of downstream traffic, its share has more than doubled in the past 18 months
In advance of plans to start offering a stand-alone streaming subscriptions in the US, HBOGO accounts for just 1 per cent of downstream traffic in the region
On a fixed network in Australasia, where Netflix isn’t even available yet, approximately 2.5 per cent of subscribers are accessing the service and it comprises as much as 4 per cent of peak downstream traffic"
Full report here

Multi-Screening is now mainstream in Europe

"During peaktime viewing in the UK, 74 per cent claim to have picked up an internet connected device during TV ad breaks, with very little difference between age groups, social demographics or gender (Craft/Thinkbox ‘Screen Life: TV advertising everywhere’, 2014)
Most TV shows attract some social media commentary, but the shows which attract the most tend to be live sports and reality TV shows – the 2014 BRIT Awards in the UK saw a vast volume of Twitter conversation with 4.2 million Tweets about the show.
42 per cent of French viewers aged 15-60 say that they have engaged with a TV programme via a social network (OmnicomMediaGroup/ Mesagraph – Social Télévision)
37 per cent of Swiss say that it’s “normal” and “commonplace” to use the internet while watching TV (Publisuisse, ‘Media du Future 2017’)
In Spain, 62 per cent of people claimed in 2013 to use a second screen while watching TV – an increase of 11 percentage points compared to the previous year (Televidente 2.0, 2013)
In Sweden, 55 per cent viewers have used another screen (smartphone, tablet or computer) while watching TV (MMS Moving Images 2014:1)
33 per cent of people in Poland have multi-screened and almost half of multi-screening activity (49 per cent) is in order to look at content that is related to what is being watched (Millward Brown ‘AdReaction 2014’)."
(Lots more stats in the full article)

The 'serial' podcast has nearly 1.3 million downloads per episode

"In the normally low-profile world of podcasting, “Serial” is a certified sensation—a testament to the power of great storytelling. It’s quickly become the most popular podcast in the world, according to Apple, and the fastest to reach 5 million downloads and streams in iTunes history. “Serial” is the top podcast in the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and Australia, and in the top 10 in Germany, South Africa and India.
[...]
“Serial” is downloaded an average 1.26 million times per episode, sending fans into debates over the finer points of the evidence. People can hear the podcast, which is like a radio show but entirely on the Internet, either by streaming it from the “Serial” website or downloading it onto a phone, tablet or computer from a platform like iTunes."

Consumers spend more time with mobiles than TV in the US



Source:  Data from Flurry, reported in a blog post, 18th November 2014


TV data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Note - Ofcom's International Communications Market Report gives a higher figure for TV - 293 minutes



Source - Ofcom ICMR December 2013

Thursday, 20 November 2014

About 50% of YouTube's views come from mobiles or tablets

"YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki appeared at the Code/Mobile event on October 27 and shared some stats about the online video site. One of the most interesting numbers concerned mobile devices, which now supply about 50% of YouTube’s views.
This is up 10% from the last time YouTube reported any stats related to mobile viewing. In 2013, the Google-owned video platform claimed roughly 40% of the site’s views came from mobile devices. And a year before that, in 2012, only a quarter of its views were from mobile.
“Mobile is super important. I think it’s important for every business right now,” Wojcicki said to Re/code at the Code/Mobile event."

Wednesday, 19 November 2014

Teespring, 'the Kickstarter for T-shirts' has sold 6m shirts in 2014

"Some tech companies look to change the way we communicate or can travel in space. Teespring helps people sell t-shirts. Custom, well-made t-shirts. And it’s good at what it does.
Teespring has sold 6 million shirts this year through its customers, hundreds of whom make more than $100,000 from their tee trade. At least ten, the company says, have become millionaires from the work. Teespring claims that one in 75 Americans owns a shirt  it’s helped sell in the last year. For 2015, the startup plans to go even bigger, and it’s raised millions in venture backing to get ready. The two-year-old startup announced Tues. it’s raised $35 million in a Series B round led by Khosla Ventures, with partner Keith Rabois joining the board. Earlier investors and board members include Lars Dalgaard of Andreessen Horowitz and Sam Altman of Y Combinator."

Sunday, 16 November 2014

You need 'at least 100' Facebook friends to verify yourself on Airbnb

"At the other end of the Airbnb helpline in Colorado, “Casey” sounded incredulous. “You have how many Facebook friends?” she drawled. “Er … about 50,” I replied. Long pause. “Well, you don’t have enough for us to verify you. You’d need at least 100.”
“But”, I squeaked, “I post every now and again … I’m on Facebook most days to check on my friends and relations.” This, however, was not enough to convince Airbnb I existed. And, as I didn’t exist, I could not book a room.
Helpful Casey had another suggestion: why not upload a video of myself saying why and where I wanted to book. The problem with that, I explained, was that the Airbnb link supplied was incompatible with my iPad 2. Use your smartphone, suggested Casey. I didn’t have one, said I. There was an audible intake of breath.
Have you ever been told you don’t have enough friends – and are a Luddite to boot? It’s crushing. And more to the point, I had a flight booked to Bremen in Germany, for two; I had tickets for the Glocke concert hall; but I still had nowhere to stay on the first weekend of November – that of the Freimarkt, the oldest fair in Germany – one of the busiest on the Bremen calendar.
Earlier that week I had logged on to Airbnb for the first time in search of a room for two. I found one (with “Sabine”) that ticked the boxes, filled in my credit card details, and booked … or so I thought. Back bounced an email saying that I was not acceptable to Sabine, and my money had been returned. So I tried to book with “Harald”. The same thing happened. “Viktoria” (“Nice room, near park”) rejected me, too.
I’m a middle-aged mum of two, I’m a school governor, I have an impeccable credit record. But I couldn’t book a B&B. Not when I didn’t have enough “friends”."

Friday, 14 November 2014

There are approximately 200,000 film-related tweets per day



Source:  New research from Twitter, reported in a blog post, 7th November 2014

Xiaomi sold 1.2m phones during Singes Day 2014

""November 11 saw a new record for the world’s biggest shopping day as Alibaba’s shoppers spent US$9.3 billion in 24 hours on the company’s two main ecommerce marketplaces, Tmall and Taobao. The top Tmall brand store on that sales bonanza day was Xiaomi, the budget smartphone maker. Today Xiaomi revealed that it saw a record high of 1.16 million phones sold during China’s Singles Day event.
Along with Xiaomi’s other gadgets, such as its new MiBand fitness tracker, Xiaomi pulled in RMB 1.56 billion – that’s US$254 million – in sales volume in that 24-hour period. The figure is well up from Singles Day in 2013 when Xiaomi’s customers spent US$89 million.
Xiaomi points out that it was China’s top-selling phone, TV, tablet, wearable, and a few other first-place distinctions during the day of discounts. Xiaomi discounted its new Mi4 smartphone by a relatively small amount compared to some other brands’ products on Singles Day, dropping it from US$325 to US$293."

Tweets drive time-shifted TV viewing


"Not surprisingly, the most important factor changing how many viewers watch later was an episode’s live audience tune in, accounting for 42% of variance in +7 TV audiences. So, just under half of the difference between the live and +7 audiences can be explained by the size of the original live audience. Conventional wisdom on several other variables also bore out. For example, reality series were 31% more likely to be watched live. A premiere episode, regardless of genre, was 15% more likely to be watched live.
Interestingly, all 11 variables tested proved to be statistically significant. In other words, all measurements and characteristics we looked at affect time-shifted viewing. In fact, this integrated model explains 72% of the variance in the +7 audience, significantly higher than what the live audience could explain alone. Moreover, Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings (NTTR) impressions were significant, even after accounting for the effect of the other 10 variables. Specifically, a 10% increase in NTTR impressions corresponded to a 1.8% increase in the +7 audience, indicating that social media activity around TV programming is playing a role in driving viewers to watch programming later in the week."